Cool Sounding Words to Say and Write

cool-sounding-words

The English language has about a million words, the Oxford dictionary alone has thousands of words added every year – and still going strong. Some words are formal, some are slang, some are simple, some are complex, and some are just plain awesome.

Below is a list of 33 cool sounding words in the English language. Whether written or spoken, these words are beautiful, so scan them to see which ones you already know and which ones you can start using!

1. Akimbo (adj.)

Placed in such a way as to have the hands-on the hips and the elbows bowed outward. Example: Mom looked at the mess in my room, arms akimbo, and started yelling at the top of her lungs.

2. Amenable (adj.)

Open and responsive to suggestions. Example: Is this contract set in stone or is it amenable to change?

3. Aurora (n.)

The dawn in the early morning. Example: The aurora over the skyline was too beautiful not to photograph.

4. Bamboozled (ad.)

Thrown into a state of confusion or bewilderment especially by being deliberately fooled or misled. Example: The criminal hoped his disguise would have the police at the airport bamboozled.

5. Bombastic (n.)

One who is full of himself; a self-absorbed person; giving oneself high self-esteem or exaggerated dignity. Example: Her bombastic rant made him rethink her decision to go on a date with her.

6. Candor (n.)

The quality of being open and honest in expression. Example: The politician’s candor and honesty made him win in the election.

7. Clandestine (adj.)

Marked by, held in, or conducted with secrecy. Example: From their cover, the police watched as the clandestine drug deal occurred.

8. Clinomania (n.)

Excessive desire to stay in bed. Example: I definitely have clinomania; I love sleeping, making mornings a struggle for me.

9. Cogent (adj.)

Clear, logical, and convincing, Example: Because the girl was so young, I tried to give her cogent answers to her questions.

10. Conundrum (n.)

An intricate and difficult problem. Example: Upset by the conundrum, she found it difficult to sleep.

11. Crestfallen (adj.)

Having a drooping crest or hanging head; feeling shame or humiliation. Example: The young politician was crestfallen after not winning the election.

12. Diabolical (adj.)

Of, relating to, or characteristic of the devil. Example: The evil mastermind created a diabolical plan to take over the world.

13. Dogged (adj.)

Tenacious or persistent. Example: Although the police kept questioning Mary about her involvement in the robbery, she kept a dogged silence.

14. Draconian (adj.)

Harsh and Cruel. Example: My husband says having to eat my cooking is a type of draconian punishment.

15. Elicit (v.)

To draw out in response to one’s own actions or questions. Example: The stand-up comedian hoped his jokes would elicit lots of laughter from the audience.

16. Epitome (n.)

A person/thing that perfectly exemplifies a particular quality or type. Example: With his leather jacket and cigarette, Hugh was the epitome of a carefree playboy.

17. Flippant (adj.)

Lacking proper respect or seriousness. Example: He apologized for his flippant remark.

18. Frivolous (adj.)

Without serious purpose or value. Example: Spending money on lottery tickets when you can’t afford to pay your bills seems frivolous to me.

19. Hyperbolic (adj.)

Of, relating to, or marked by language that exaggerates or overstates the truth; of, relating to, or marked by hyperbole. Example: To sell a car, salesmen often use hyperbolic language to make the car seem more exciting than it actually is.

20. Idyllic (adj.)

Like an idyll; extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque. Example: The blossom growing in the courtyard created such an idyllic setting.

21. Incognito (adj.)

Having one’s identity concealed, as under an assumed name, especially to avoid notice or formal attention. Example: After faking her own death, she attended her funeral incognito to see what people were saying about her.

22. Ineffable (adj.)

Too extreme to be expressed in words. Example: The bride’s beauty is ineffable and has all the guests tongue-tied.

23. Kleptomania (n.)

An irresistible impulse to steal, stemming from emotional disturbance rather than economic need.

24. Languish (v.)

To be or become weak or feeble; droop; fade. Example: Without sunlight, the plant will languish and eventually die.

25. Latitude (n.)

Room for freedom of action or thought. Example: My mother gave me the latitude to choose my own curfew.

26. Persnickety (adj.)

Overparticular; fussy

Snobbish or having the aloof attitude of a snob.

Example: The persnickety housewife couldn’t stand for anything to be out of place in her house.

27. Picturesque (adj.)

Visually charming or quaint, as if suitable for or resembling a painting. Example: The picturesque postcard made me wish I was on the beach.

(of writing, speech, etc.) Strikingly graphic or vivid; creating detailed mental images. Example: A picturesque description of the Amazon rainforest.

28. Sequoia (n.)

(A 7 letter word that has the letter Q and all 5 vowels) A redwood tree, especially the California redwood. Example: I love visiting forests where you can see a sequoia.

29. Sinister (adj.)

Threatening or portending evil, harm, or trouble. Example: The policeman quickly took note of the man’s sinister appearance.

30. Solitude (n.)

A state of seclusion or isolation. Example: We enjoyed the beauty and solitude of the quiet beach more than ever.

31. Transcendent( adj.)

Beyond the scope of normal human experience; exceptional. Example: The scientist had many transcendent theories that didn’t sit well with his conservative peers.

32. Woo (v.)

To try to gain someone’s love or affection. Example: The lovestruck gentleman tried really hard to woo the young lady.

33. Zealous (adj.)

Demonstrating great energy, enthusiasm, or support. Example: As I looked around the football stadium, I saw a lot of zealous fans wearing face paint.

Wrap Up

There you have it, 33 cool-sounding words to spice up your vocabulary. Which one is your favorite?